2013/07/27

A Long Life Prayer for Gyaltsap Rinpoche by the 17th Karmapa




རྒྱལ་ཀུན་ཐུགས་ཀྱི་རྡོ་རྗེ་གསང་བའི་བདག །

GYAL KUN THUK KYI DOR JE SANG WE DAK

You are Vajrapani, representing the vajra mind of all Buddhas


རྒྱལ་གསུང་བཀའ་ཡི་སྡུད་པོ་ཀུན་དགའ་བོ། །

GYAL SUNG KA YI DUE PO KUN GA WO 
You are Ananda, one who compiled Buddha's teachings

རྒྱལ་མཆོག་ཀརྨ་པ་ཡི་གདུང་འཛིན་པ། །
GYAL CHOK KAR MA PA YI DUNG ZIN PA 
You are the spiritual heir to the Glorious Karmapa

རྒྱལ་ཚབ་གོ་ཤྲཱི་ཆེན་པོའི་ཞབས་བརྟན་གསོལ། །
GYAL TSAB GO SHIR CHEN POE SHAB TEN SOL
Supreme Goshir Gyaltsabpa, I pray that your lotus feet remain firm. 

རྒྱལ་དབང་ཀརྨ་པ་བཅུ་བདུན་པས། 
By The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa


Translated by Acharya Sherab Tenzin and Ziche Leethong

2013/07/26

H. H. Karmapa - Refuge Prayers, Four Boundless Mind



Refuge Prayers
Chanted by H. H. Karmapa.

In the Buddha, the Dharma and the Sangha,
I go for Refuge until Enlightenment is reached.
By the merit of practicing generosity and the other virtues
May Buddhahood be realized for the benefit of all beings.

Four Boundless Mind
Chanted by H. H. Karmapa.

May all sentient beings be happy and have the cause of happiness,
May they be separated from suffering and the cause of suffering,
Be inseparable from the perfect bliss which is completely free from suffering
May they all without least exception, dwell in the universal equanimity which is unbiased by attachment for dear and near ones and aversion from distant ones.






Read more: 
H.H. The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa in Bodhgaya, CD »


2013/07/18

HH Gyalwang Karmapa - The Aspiration for The Well-Being of Tibet



Aspiration for the Well-Being of Tibet 

Undeceiving sources of refuge, three jewels and three roots;
Especially Avalokita, protector of the Land of Snow;
Noble lady Tara; Guru Padmakara:
I pray to you. Consider your pledges and promises.
Grant your blessings that my aspirations be fulfilled.

Through the incorrect thoughts and actions of beings in degenerate times
And turmoil of the outer and inner elements,
There are new human and animal diseases.
We are struck by planets, naga, gyalpos, and evil bhutas;
Blight, frost, hail, and poor harvests; war and fightings;
Uneven rainfall, blizzards, destruction by voles and rats,
Earthquakes, fire, danger from the four elements;
And, in particular, invasions that threaten the dharma.

May all such things that menace this Land of Snow
Be quickly pacified and eradicated.
May all beings, human and non-human,
Naturally generate precious bodhicitta
And be free from malevolent thoughts and actions.
May they love one another.
May all of Tibet be filled with joy, well-being, and wealth.
May the buddhadharma spread, flourish, and long remain.

Through the power of the truth of the three roots, buddhas, and bodhisattvas;
The power of all the roots of virtue in samsara and nirvana;
And the power of our pure benevolence,
May what we have prayed and wished for be accomplished.


2013/07/13

Book Review: His Holiness the 17th Karmapa(Asia Sentinel)

Written by John Berthelsen   
SATURDAY, 13 JULY 2013



A biography by Tsering Namgyal Khortsa. Paperback, 292 pp, Hay House India

On the night of Dec. 28, 1999, the 14-year-old Ogyen Trinley Dorje made a fateful decision. Accepted and celebrated by both the Chinese government and the Tibetans as the reincarnated 17th Karmapa Lama – the only high Tibetan priest recognized by both of the warring sides, used to the presence of such dignitaries as the Chinese leader Jiang Zemin, the Karmapa, along with the Dalai Lama and the Panchen Lama, was one of Tibetan Buddhism’s triumvirate of highest holy men, the prelate of the Karma Kagyu order.

The young teenager, however, decided that he could no longer be what the Chinese government wanted him to be. Even as early as the age of 9, the Karmapa was already rebelling against Chinese pressure, refusing to read from prepared texts and almost daring the Chinese, to the consternation of his advisors. On the surface, writes Tsering Namgyal, the author who spent a year with the Karmapa to research this book, “the Chinese government treated the Karmapa with great respect and reference, which his position deserved…Yet, behind the scenes, pressure was quietly mounting on the Karmapa.”

On that night, the youth and his closest and most trusted advisors disappeared from the monastery where the Chinese had installed him to begin a trip over the top of the Himalayas, 800 miles by foot, horseback, jeep, and other transport, across some of the most rugged terrain on the face of the earth in the middle of winter, to reach Dharamasala, the exile capital of the Dalai Lama, who had fled there in 1959. Remarkably, according to Namgyal, it appears to have been his decision, not that of his advisors and seniors.

The propaganda blow to the Chinese was humiliating. They had earlier kidnapped the six-year-old who had been picked by Tibetan priests as the reincarnated 10th Panchen Lama, who has never been seen again, and installed their own Panchen Lama in his place, a stunning demonstration of just how ham-fisted the Chinese government can be. The idea that their own Karmapa would reject them and flee for India must have been devastating.

There appears to be more than just rebellion to the Karmapa, now 28 years old and living quietly in a monastery near Dharamsala, India. Even if you tend to be skeptical of reincarnation, according to Namgyal’s account, he displays a striking amount of intelligence and maturity and the occasional miraculous performance. He appears to be a powerful advocate of Buddhism, able to draw huge crowds to hear him speak – and, if the book is to be believed, able to make rain to end long droughts, as his predecessor, the 16th Karmapa, did as well, on an Indian reservation in the American southwest. In particular, he has involved himself in drawing the symbiotic relationship between Buddhism and the environment, Namgyal writes.

Partly because of his unique position of having escaped China, the Karmapa is almost a prisoner of the Indian government, allowed out only occasionally to travel and visit and to perform powerful Buddhist ceremonies. He has not been allowed to return to the monastery of the 16th Karmapa in the kingdom of Sikkim despite his wish to do so. At one point he was charged with laundering money although the charges were dropped as a farce. There is some controversy over his direct lineage to the 16th Karmapa, with two senior disciples of the 16th Karmapa identifying two different boys as the true Karmapa. Namgyal doesn’t really get into the controversy, pointing out that the Dalai Lama, the faith’s highest religious figure, has identified Ogyen Trinley Dorje as the true Karmapa, and that’s kind of that.

The Karmapa– and the Dalai Lama as well – of course represent a religion and a people in a large measure of crisis. More than 100 young Tibetans have set themselves afire to protest not so much the occupation of Tibet, which much of the world views as illegal, as the way the Chinese have screwed the lid down tight on human rights. At the same time, the vast, empty spaces of the Tibetan plateau and mountain ranges are being invaded increasingly by the Han Chinese. A significant number have fled their homeland, not only for Dharamasala but across the earth.

As with the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa represents, in his person as well as his position, a beacon to the Tibetan dispossessed, a person whose other activities “have manifested themselves particularly in the field of environment, interactions with scientists and his use of art in spreading Buddhist teachings. Very few individuals have performed such a diverse range of activities, let alone someone of his age."

Tibetans, Namgyal writes, respect him much as they do the Dalai Lama, because “he is a 21st century Buddhist. He asks his students and followers time and again to experiment, to develop critical faculties and refrain from falling victim to blind faith."

The book suffers somewhat for being in too many places a recitation of where the Karmapa spoke, and to how many people, instead of focusing in what the man told the crowds, and what makes him special. Certainly, it is more personal journey than biography of the Karmapa. Nonetheless, it is a valuable addition to the Tibetan Buddhist canon, providing both a history of the land and its people as well, drawing concise pictures of other religious leaders such as the 16th Karmapa, who truly appears to have been a figure larger than life. Namgyal delves into the signs that Tibetan priests look for in determining which child is a reincarnated prelate.

For Namgyal, who now lives in New York City and is perhaps the most widely published journalist and writer of Tibetan origin, this is a book of personal discovery as well, a look into his own aspirations and objectives as a Buddhist and as a writer as well as a picture of the Karmapa.

2013/07/11

HH the 17th Karmapa - The Short Vajradhara Lineage Prayer




Prayer composed by Pengar Jampel Sangpo
Melody composed & chanted by HH the 17th Gyalwang karmapa



DORJE CHANG THUNGMA
The Short Vajradhara Lineage Prayer
大手印傳承祈請文

DOR JÉ CHANG CHEN TÉLO NARO DANG 
Great Vajradhara, Tilopa, Naropa
金剛總持帝洛那諾巴,

MARPA MILA CHÖJE GAMPOPA 
Marpa, Milarepa, and Lord of the Dharma, Gampopa
馬巴密勒法王岡波巴,

DÜSUM SHÉ JA KÜN KHYEN KARMAPA 
Knower of the three times, omniscient Karmapa
普明三世遍知噶瑪巴,

CHÉ ZHI CHUNG GYE GYÜ PA DZIN NAM DANG 
Lineage holders of the four great and eight lesser schools
四大八小傳承持有者。

DRI TAK TSAL SUM PALDEN DRUKPA SOK 
Drikung, Taklung, Tsalpa, glorious Drukpa and others,
止達察派具德竹巴等,

ZAB LAM CHAK GYA CHÉ LA NGA NYÉ PÉ 
You who have thoroughly mastered the profound path of Mahamudra
於甚深道大印得自在,

NYAM MÉ DRO GÖN DAKPO KAGYÜLA 
Unrivaled protectors of beings, the Dakpo Kagyü 
 達波噶舉無比眾生怙,

SOLWA DEBSO KAGYÜ LAMA NAM 
I pray to you, the Kagyü lamas
於諸口傳上師作祈請,

GYÜ PA DZIN NO NAM TAR JIN GYI LOB 
Grant your blessing that we may follow your tradition and example.
持有傳承記述祈加持。

ZHEN LOK GOM GYI KANGPAR SUNGPA ZHIN 
Detachment is the foot of meditation, it is taught.
教云離欲即為修行足,

ZÉ NOR KÜN LA CHAK ZHEN MÉ PA DANG 
Attachment to food and wealth disappears
於諸飲食財寶無繫念,

TSEN DIR DÖ TAK CHÖ PAY GOM CHEN LA 
To the meditator who gives up ties to this life,
斷離此世貪網之行者,

NYE KUR ZHEN PA ME PAR JIN GYI LOB 
Grant your blessing that attachment to ownership and honor cease.
無著名聞利養祈加持。

MÖ GÖ GOM GYI GO WOR SUNG PA ZHIN 
Devotion is the head of meditation, it is taught.
教云虔敬即為修行首,

MEN NGAK TERGO JÉ PAY LAMA LA 
The lama opens the door to the profound oral teachings
上師開啟教誡寶藏門,

GYÜN DU SOLWA DEB PAY GOM CHEN LA 
To the meditator who always turns to him,
於諸恆常祈請之行者,

CHÖ MIN MÖ GÜ KYÉ WAR JIN GYI LOB 
Grant your blessing that uncontrived devotion be born within.
加持生起無偽之虔敬。

YENG MÉ GOM GYI NGÖ ZHIR SUNG PA ZHIN 
Unwavering attention is the body of meditation, it is taught.
教云毋逸即是修正行,

GANG SHAR TOK PAY NGO WO SO MA DÉ 
Whatever arises, is the fresh nature of thought.
隨顯即悟體性自如如,

MA CHÖ DÉ KAR JOK PAY GOM CHEN LA 
To the meditator who rests there in naturalness,
住於任運無整之行者,

GOM JA LO DANG DRAL WAR JIN GYI LOB 
Grant your blessings that meditation is free from intellectualization.
修行遠離妄心祈加持。

NAM TOK NGOWO CHÖ KUR SUNG PA ZHIN 
The essence of thought is dharmakaya, it is taught.
教云妄念體性即法身,

CHI YANG MA YIN CHIR YANG CHAR WA LA 
They are nothing whatsoever, and yet they arise.
所顯非真宛然而顯現,

MA NGAK ROLPAR CHAR WAY GOM CHEN LA 
To the meditator who reflects upon the unobstructed play of the mind,
不滅幻有顯現之行者,

KHOR DÉ JER MÉ TOK PAR JIN GYI LOB 
Grant your blessing that the inseparability of samsara and nirvana be realized.
證悟輪涅不二祈加持。

KYÉ WA KÜN TU YANG DAK LAMA DANG 
Through all my births, may I not be separated
世世不離清淨上師尊,

DRAL MÉ CHÖ KYI PAL LA LONG CHÖ CHING 
From the perfect Lama and so enjoy the glory of the dharma.
受用殊勝吉祥之法教,

SA DANG LA GYI YÖNTEN RAP DZOK NÉ 
May I completely accomplish the qualities of the path and stages
五道十地功德悉圓滿,

DOR JÉ CHANG GI GO PHANG NYUR TOP SHOK 
And quickly attain the state of Vajradhara (awakened mind).
願速證得金剛持果位。

2013/07/08

Bodhgaya blasts: Tibetan leader appeals for peace (India Today)

IANS  Dharamsala, July 8, 2013 | UPDATED 12:20 IST





Tibetan religious head and the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje on Monday appealed to his followers to remain calm and refrain from escalation of violence in the wake of the blasts in Bihar's Bodhgaya town.

"I was deeply saddened to hear of the senseless violence perpetrated Sunday at the Mahabodhi temple and its environs in Bodhgaya," the Karmapa, a frequent visitor at the Mahabodhi temple, said in a statement here.

This is the place, he said, where Buddhist pilgrims from India and the world over pay homage to Lord Buddha and his teachings.

"As yet, we do not know why or by whom this sacred site was targeted. However, I am convinced that, as Buddhists, in responding to this situation, the best homage we can pay to Lord Buddha is to uphold his teachings on love and ahimsa (nonviolence)," said the 28-year-old monk.

"I ask you, therefore, to remain calm and refrain from any further escalation of the violence. I offer my prayers for the victims and their families, and call on Buddhists everywhere to truly embrace the wisdom of Lord Buddha's teachings in all that we do."

Nine blasts took place between 5.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. Sunday at the over two millennia old Mahabodhi temple, annually visited by millions of pilgrims from all over the world, especially from Sri Lanka, China, Japan and the Southeast Asia region.

The Karmapa has been residing in the Gyuto Tantric University and Monastery on the outskirts of this town, the seat of the Tibetan government-in-exile, ever since he mysteriously escaped to India in January 2000.

In the Tibetan religious hierarchy, he is considered the third most important Tibetan religious head after the Dalai Lama and Panchen Lama.

The Dalai Lama lives in exile along with some 140,000 Tibetans, over 100,000 of them in India. Over six million Tibetans live in Tibet.

The Tibetan exile administration is based in this northern Indian hill town, but is not recognised by any country.


2013/07/07

How I start my day: Ogyen Trinley Dorje (The Times of India)



TNN Jul 7, 2013, 01.33PM IST

His Holiness The 17th Karmapa



"Start a new life every morning" 

"We sometimes wake up fresh in the morning yet still go through the day half asleep. Our busy 21st century lives overwhelm us with a relentless stream of immediate tasks. We lose sight of how precious it is just to have a human life.

This is an awareness that we need to feel in our hearts. I would like to share with you a practice that I call 'living your whole life in a single day.' You can do this by starting with this thought in the morning: 'I am starting a whole new life. It begins right now'. Initially, leave yourself a note at your bedside to remind you, and then slowly cultivate the habit of waking up with this thought.

Your body is fresh from the night's rest; when you wake up with this awareness, so does your mind. Ask yourself what kind of person you want to be in the life that you will live today. Throughout the day, remind yourself that your life is happening right now. In the afternoon, check to see how your life is going and readjust as needed. A whole lifetime of possibilities stretches out before you every moment.

This is the basic truth of interdependence. Conditions are constantly shifting, and what seemed impossible earlier can suddenly become possible. Every moment counts. Every action counts. A single kind act can have a positive impact on the future of many others you share the earth with. You can change the course of the future in any moment. Do so consciously, and the whole world will benefit.
(As told to Nona Walia)


Message From His Holiness The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa On The Bombing Of The Mahabodhi Temple And Its Environs.



I was deeply saddened to hear of the senseless violence perpetrated today at the Mahabodhi temple and its environs in Bodhgaya. This is the place where Buddhist pilgrims from India and the world over pay homage to Lord Buddha and his teachings.
As yet we do not know why or by whom this sacred site was targeted. However, I am convinced that, as Buddhists, in responding to this situation, the best homage we can pay to Lord Buddha is to uphold his teachings on love and ahimsa (non-violence).
I ask you, therefore, to remain calm and refrain from any further escalation of the violence. I offer my prayers for the victims and their families, and call on Buddhists everywhere to truly embrace the wisdom of Lord Buddha’s teachings in all that we do.
17th Karmapa, OgyenTrinley Dorje
Dharamsala,
7th July, 2013.

2013/07/06

Compassion is a powerful heartfelt quality: 17th Karmapa (TPI)


Friday, 05 July 2013 12:41 Yeshe Choesang, The Tibet Post International





Dharamshala: - A few days after his 28th birthday the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa of Tibet delighted local students and devotees from various parts of the country by giving an impromptu teaching at the request of students at Gyuto Monastery based near Dharamshala, his temporary residence.
"Although the teaching was unplanned, word had quickly spread and a crowd soon filled the monastery, eager to receive the Gyalwang Karmapa's wisdom," said Kagyu Office.
His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorjee began by thanking those gathered for taking interest in his recent birthday, and for their personal celebrations and aspiration prayers. "Apart from sublime, spiritually advanced individuals, for the rest of us as ordinary people in the world we are subject to the sufferings of birth, aging, sickness and death," he said. "I personally see no need to celebrate my birthday as such, given that birth is, generally speaking, nothing but suffering. However, I still feel that I need to express a personal thank you to all of you and the many people who see my birthday as an occasion to make virtuous prayers and dedications."
Following his regular custom, at the beginning of the teaching the Gyalwang Karmapa offered those gathered the oral transmission for the practice of Four-Armed Chenrezig. Describing this particular practice as being the practice of compassion itself, he then went on to teach extensively on compassion.
"What we call compassion is the wish or desire to be capable of protecting sentient beings from suffering," he began. "We could call it a sense of determination, a sense of courage or resolve. That is compassion. It is not merely something intellectual that belongs to the brain or that sphere of our experience. But rather it is a powerful heartfelt feeling or quality, one that must be sincere. This is how I see it."
Tying together the need for compassion with the reality of interdependence in our contemporary world, the Gyalwang Karmapa emphasized the links between others' welfare and our own.


"Now in the 21st century we find ourselves in what we might call the information era," he explained. "Within this era of information I would say that now more than ever the suffering of other beings really becomes part of our individual experience. This is not merely an idea, but rather it describes the actual reality of the world that we live in now. As we continue in this age of information we can see that our world is getting smaller and smaller and all of us within it are becoming closer and closer to one another. And so it should be increasingly evident that the experiences of other sentient beings are in fact part of our own individual experience."
"This is not merely a notion or a concept, but rather it is a fact of our reality as we experience it now," he continued. "Other beings' suffering is part of our own individual experience. And this is true by virtue of the fact of our mutual dependence upon one another. Because we are mutually connected or interrelated, whatever impact there is on one individual in fact becomes an impact that affects all of us. So I think that in these terms compassion is an especially realistic way of relating to our existing situation in these times."
The Gyalwang Karmapa then explained that compassion must begin with compassion for ourselves. Moreover, compassion should not allow for any sense of separation between ourselves and those we feel compassion for, but rather it should allow us to identify more closely with others.
"In order to develop our ability to feel compassion for others we need to begin with ourselves," he said. "We need to consider at an individual level how we are oppressed by suffering. And that then becomes the model that serves as the basis for how we can expand our understanding of the quality of others' experience, whether it be good or bad."
"In looking at this relationship we are trying to develop compassion for someone else as the object of compassion," he continued. "From our side, we're the one who feels or cultivates that sense of understanding. But if we have the conception that we ourselves are in a good situation and we're looking at someone else who is in an unfortunate situation, then there is a sense of separation there."
"We should not allow for that sense of separation to come between us and those that we feel compassion for. But rather, we should strive to feel that we are part of that person who is suffering, that we are sharing in their experience and in that way base our compassion on a strong sense of identification with that other individual."
On June 28, he met with students from the Edinburgh University Tibet Society, offering them practical and skillful guidance on dealing with the inner challenges encountered when working for the Tibet cause.
The group of 16 students, coming from countries including the United Kingdom, Norway and Japan, are visiting India in order to collaborate with the Students for a Free Tibet organization in Dharamsala.
He thanked the students sincerely for all their support for the Tibet cause. One of the students then explained to the Gyalwang Karmapa that those working actively for the Tibet cause are faced with very difficult and sometimes harrowing issues. “Often these issues give rise to very strong emotions,” she said, “so I am wondering how we can deal with these strong emotions in a positive way?”
n response the Gyalwang Karmapa offered several simple, practical and profound methods for coping with strong emotions when they arise. “I think that in order to deal effectively with such negative or disturbing emotions that we will encounter, we need a variety of methods or strategies to draw upon,” he began. “One method involves gaining the skill to recognize the problem with disturbed states of mind, and to see that when we are emotionally upset it’s problematic for us. Once we are able to recognize the problem with being emotionally disturbed or upset, then we can gradually and naturally distance ourselves from the habit of reacting in a disturbed way.”
The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorjee is the head of the 900 year old Karma Kagyu Lineage and guide to millions of Buddhists around the world.
Currently 28 years old, the Karmapa resides in his temporary home at Gyuto Monastery in India after making a dramatic escape from Tibet in the year 2000.


2013/07/05

Gyalwang Karmapa Teaches On Compassion



30 June 2013 – Gyuto Monastery, Dharamsala
A few days after his 28th birthday the Gyalwang Karmapa delighted local students and devotees by giving an impromptu teaching at the request of students at Gyuto Monastery, his temporary residence. Although the teaching was unplanned, word had quickly spread and a crowd soon filled the gompa, eager to receive the Gyalwang Karmapa’s wisdom.
He began by thanking those gathered for taking interest in his recent birthday, and for their personal celebrations and aspiration prayers. “Apart from sublime, spiritually advanced individuals, for the rest of us as ordinary people in the world we are subject to the sufferings of birth, aging, sickness and death,” he said. “I personally see no need to celebrate my birthday as such, given that birth is, generally speaking, nothing but suffering. However, I still feel that I need to express a personal thank you to all of you and the many people who see my birthday as an occasion to make virtuous prayers and dedications.”
Following his regular custom, at the beginning of the teaching the Gyalwang Karmapa offered those gathered the oral transmission for the practice of Four-Armed Chenrezig. Describing this particular practice as being the practice of compassion itself, he then went on to teach extensively on compassion.
“What we call compassion is the wish or desire to be capable of protecting sentient beings from suffering,” he began. “We could call it a sense of determination, a sense of courage or resolve. That is compassion. It is not merely something intellectual that belongs to the brain or that sphere of our experience. But rather it is a powerful heartfelt feeling or quality, one that must be sincere. This is how I see it.”
Tying together the need for compassion with the reality of interdependence in our contemporary world, the Gyalwang Karmapa emphasized the links between others’ welfare and our own.
“Now in the 21st century we find ourselves in what we might call the information era,” he explained. “Within this era of information I would say that now more than ever the suffering of other beings really becomes part of our individual experience. This is not merely an idea, but rather it describes the actual reality of the world that we live in now. As we continue in this age of information we can see that our world is getting smaller and smaller and all of us within it are becoming closer and closer to one another. And so it should be increasingly evident that the experiences of other sentient beings are in fact part of our own individual experience.”
“This is not merely a notion or a concept, but rather it is a fact of our reality as we experience it now,” he continued. “Other beings’ suffering is part of our own individual experience. And this is true by virtue of the fact of our mutual dependence upon one another. Because we are mutually connected or interrelated, whatever impact there is on one individual in fact becomes an impact that affects all of us. So I think that in these terms compassion is an especially realistic way of relating to our existing situation in these times.”
The Gyalwang Karmapa then explained that compassion must begin with compassion for ourselves. Moreover, compassion should not allow for any sense of separation between ourselves and those we feel compassion for, but rather it should allow us to identify more closely with others.
“In order to develop our ability to feel compassion for others we need to begin with ourselves,” he said. “We need to consider at an individual level how we are oppressed by suffering. And that then becomes the model that serves as the basis for how we can expand our understanding of the quality of others’ experience, whether it be good or bad.”
“In looking at this relationship we are trying to develop compassion for someone else as the object of compassion,” he continued. “From our side, we’re the one who feels or cultivates that sense of understanding. But if we have the conception that we ourselves are in a good situation and we’re looking at someone else who is in an unfortunate situation, then there is a sense of separation there. We should not allow for that sense of separation to come between us and those that we feel compassion for. But rather, we should strive to feel that we are part of that person who is suffering, that we are sharing in their experience and in that way base our compassion on a strong sense of identification with that other individual.”



http://kagyuoffice.org/gyalwang-karmapa-teaches-on-compassion-2/

2013/07/04

Gyalwang Karmapa Offers Spiritual Guidance To Young Scottish Students





















28 June 2013, Gyuto Monastery – Dharamsala

The Gyalwang Karmapa today met with students from the Edinburgh University Tibet Society, offering them practical and skillful guidance on dealing with the inner challenges encountered when working for the Tibet cause.

The group of 16 students, coming from countries including the United Kingdom, Norway and Japan, are visiting India in order to collaborate with the Students for a Free Tibet organization in Dharamsala.

He began by thanking the students sincerely for all their support for the Tibet cause. One of the students then explained to the Gyalwang Karmapa that those working actively for the Tibet cause are faced with very difficult and sometimes harrowing issues. “Often these issues give rise to very strong emotions,” she said, “so I am wondering how we can deal with these strong emotions in a positive way?”

In response the Gyalwang Karmapa offered several simple, practical and profound methods for coping with strong emotions when they arise. “I think that in order to deal effectively with such negative or disturbing emotions that we will encounter, we need a variety of methods or strategies to draw upon,” he began. “One method involves gaining the skill to recognize the problem with disturbed states of mind, and to see that when we are emotionally upset it’s problematic for us. Once we are able to recognize the problem with being emotionally disturbed or upset, then we can gradually and naturally distance ourselves from the habit of reacting in a disturbed way.”

Next he urged the students to look even deeper into their own minds in order to see the true nature of emotional disturbances. Doing so can bring about transformative results, he added.
“We need to find a way to deal constructively with disturbed states of mind. One technique that we have is to look directly at the nature of mental disturbances or afflictions. By confronting the nature of that disturbed state of mind, we discover that we can defuse the potency and undermine the intensity of those mental afflictions – and therefore we don’t have to follow them compulsively whenever we get upset.”

“So therefore,” he continued, “I think some of the key techniques that might be useful are firstly to recognize mental afflictions as soon as they arise, and then see if we can rest within the state of that recognition, knowing our mental disturbances for what they are and thus gaining greater freedom from them.”

The Gyalwang Karmapa then explained to the students the great value of maintaining a sense of inner awareness throughout all our daily activities, illustrating his point with a simple focus upon the breath.

“To have a sense of introspective awareness and alertness from one moment to the next is very important,” he advised. “To give you one illustration of how we might develop that quality, we all breathe. Breathing is something normal; everyone does it. And yet we don’t really take much of an interest in the fact of our ongoing breathing; we don’t really notice our breathing. So if we instead relax, and take notice of the natural flow of our breathing, that can be a condition that helps us to develop greater awareness. If we recognize our breathing and use it in that way, to develop awareness, we’ll discover how important breathing is as an essential part of our lives. In fact, we cannot live if we do not breathe.”

“We could therefore say that awareness of our breathing can become a source of happiness,” he concluded. “That’s why I would say that to develop awareness and attentiveness, presence of mind from one moment to the next is very important. But this is something that is not going to happen all at once. If we’re going to use that awareness in dealing with mental afflictions, we have to be willing to practice and develop this through training gradually.”

http://kagyuoffice.org/gyalwang-karmapa-offers-spiritual-guidance-to-young-scottish-students/