2013/11/30

Birthday Celebrations for Mingyur Rinpoche



30 November 2013 – Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya
Gyalwang Karmapa today celebrated Mingyur Rinpoche’s 38th birthday by leading the monks of Tergar monastery in a dedicated long-life Tsedrup puja.
The sound of gyaling horns echoed down the stairwells from the roof of Tergar monastery, heralding the Gyalwang Karmapa’s arrival as he descended into the gompa below to lead the final session of the three-day puja. He joined around 300 monks as well as a small crowd of international devotees in the birthday long-life aspirations.
Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche, abbot of Tergar Monastery and one of the highly respected lamas, entered an advanced meditation retreat two and a half years ago. After leaving behind a letter to his students around the world setting out his intentions, he disappeared alone into the Himalayas to follow the path of a solitary wandering yogi. He carried no provisions, and no fixed plans, as he set off to meditate alone in remote Himalayan caves and at sacred sites.

2013/11/27

Harmful Friend




When we mention about harmful friend,we do not only refer to that person him/herself,but also refer to his/her harmful intention.So we should avoid them.

But,we actually also have a "harmful friend" within ourselves,i.e our harmful intention towards others that we sometimes have in our mind. If we cant avoid the harmful intention in our deeds, we will never be able to avoid the harmful friend.

—HIS HOLINESS THE 17th KARMAPA

His Holiness the XVIIth Karmapa's Message to the Next Generation




Over the last decades, a lot of changes took place in the world. These changes, fostered by material and technological developments will continue to take place. However, what we must think about is whether we will be able to gain genuine happiness through this material development or not. Likewise, it is not impossible that in the future, we might face great and unbearable mental burdens and a sense of chaos because we have made ourselves so dependent on technology. Therefore, instead of working just for material development the next generation of young people should find means and methods for gaining inner peace because what we desire is mental happiness and peace. I think it is very important for us to think deeply about that. 

2013/11/20

Repaying the Debt of Kindness to our Mothers






I prostrate to the noble Avalokiteshvara. 

She showers us with love, and says soothing words to us; 

To our kind mother who has been caring for us with love in her heart, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation.

Wherever one is born, within the six realms of the three existences,

One is born by one of the four modes of birth. 

Except for the miraculous birth, 

One derives one's form from one's parents. 

Due to the force of Karma, the relationship of mother and child is established. 

The kind mother carries the baby in her womb for nine months and ten days. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation. 

Every movement of the baby within the womb; 

Causes the kind mother great pain, like flesh and bone being torn apart; 

At the time when the baby is born covered in blood and lymphatic fluids; 

The essence in the kind mother's body is transformed into milk for feeding. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation. 

During the stage of infancy, one's body is delicate and vulnerable. 

The kind mother lifts one up with gentle hands when caring for one. 

When the eyes and the five faculties become dirty; 

The kind mother uses her soft tongue to clean away one's dirt. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation 

When smelling the stench of the unclean substances of her baby; 

The kind mother never feels disgusted. 

Day and night, the baby is always kept cozy close to her body; 

Inseparable from the chest of the kind mother. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation. 

At night, when the kind mother carried away by dull sleep; 

She wakes up time and again to care for her child. 

The kind mother always seats the baby in her soft and comfortable lap. 

The kind mother is delighted and joyful because of her beloved child. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation. 

Whenever the baby is agitated, moves and starts crying, 

The kind mother cannot bear it and nurses the baby with her breast milk. 

At the time when the baby is sleeping and she feels the cold air, 

The kind mother instantly protects the baby from the heat and cold.

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation 

At the time when one is still unable to protect one's own body; 

The kind mother dresses one in the soft and comfortable clothes. 

When the baby starts to crawl on four limbs like an animal, 

The kind mother devotedly and patiently trains the baby to walk 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation 

The kind mother constantly showers her love upon her child. 

Due to the kind mother's care, one has the ability to move about freely. 

Due to the kind mother's care, one has freedom to do whatever one wishes. 

Kind mother wandering pitifully in the three samsaric realms, 

May Avalokiteshvara lead her on the path to liberation 

My mother, one day when your body and consciousness are separated, 

I wish that you will be born in the supreme land of great bliss. 

Immediately after rebirth, may you attain Enlightenment. 

Once you are enlightened, may you benefit all sentient beings. 

Keep these words in your heart as they are very important instructions. 

Vajradhara residing in the densely-arrayed field; 

Guru Rinpoche from the pure realm of Nga Yab; 

The glorious Karmapa from the great snow land; 

May I be able to repay the debt of kindness I owe to my kind mother. 

OM MANI PADME HUNG HRI 



An excerpt from the text written by Karmapa Rangjung Dorje to express gratitude to his kind Mother. 



2013/11/19

The annual Akshobhya Retreat begins at Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya


19 November, 2013, Bodhgaya





Each year an important part of the International Kagyu  Monlam is the Akshobhya ritual, which usually takes place on the penultimate day of the Monlam, and every year a small group of  chosen, dedicated practitioners take part in a special, preparatory retreat, held in the small shrine room on the roof of Tergar Monastery, opposite the living quarters of the Gyalwang Karmapa.

This year’s retreat, composed of thirty-three practitioners drawn from European centres, North America, Asia, including two Rinpoches, and senior members of Tsurphu Labrang, will last for forty days rather than the usual four weeks. Retreatants received the empowerments for the retreat on 18th November and the retreat proper began on the 19th November. It will finish on 28thDecember. During this time, retreatants will complete six practice sessions daily, starting at 6.00 am each morning and extending until 8.30 pm in the evening, and recite the Akshobhya dharanai mantra 100,000 times. They will also receive private teachings and instructions from the Gyalwang Karmapa each day.  His Holiness is giving these teachings in Tibetan, Chinese and English, so that everyone can understand.

When the retreat finishes, the retreatants will join in all the pre-Monlam activities including the special Guru Rinpoche Tse Chu,  the Monlam itself, and finally, will form the group which supports the Gyalwang Karmapa’s activities during the fire ritual which concludes the day of  Akshobhya rituals on 14th January , 2014.

Akshobhya Buddha is one of the five Dhyani Buddhas. In Tibetan he is known as Mitrugpa, the one who never becomes disturbed by anger or aggression.  According to the story, Mitrugpa was originally a devout practitioner, a gelong, who asked, “What is the most important thing to do in order to attain enlightenment?” and the answer given was, “Don’t get angry! Don’t let your mind be disturbed!, and so he vowed “From this moment on I will never get angry with anybody,” and hence he became known as Mitrugpa – the undisturbed – until, eventually, he became the Buddha Mitrugpa.

According to the Buddhist teachings the present age is one of degeneration when all beings in the cycle of existence (samsara) are suffering because of negative thoughts and actions. The Akshobhya  ritual is a very powerful purification practice done for the benefit of all sentient beings. It can liberate not only the practitioners themselves from the fear of an unfortunate rebirth, but other beings as well.  The Buddha Akshobhya promised that the merit generated by reciting 100,000 of his long dharani mantra and making an image of him could be dedicated to other people, both living and dead, and this would assure their release from lower states of existence and rebirth in spiritually fortunate circumstances.

The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa has commended this practice as very suitable at a time when negative forces are increasing in the world.

2013/11/17

The Sacred Prophecy by Chokgyur Lingpa





Excerpt from a thangka of the vision of the great tertön Chogyur Dechen Lingpa,
who foresaw that the 17th Karmapa would receive teachings from Situ Rinpoche somewhere
outside Tibet.


The tertön Chokgyur Lingpa (1829-1870) was a great master and visionary who discovered many Dharma treasures. He was a prominent member of the vibrant nonsectarian movement that blossomed in nineteenth-century Tibet. In his prophecies about the Karmapa, he began by invoking Gyalwa Chokyang, the Karmapa’s incarnation as one of the main disciples of Guru Rinpoche:


Lotsawa Gyalwa Chokyang, listen to me.
In the supreme place of speech, Palace of the Half Moon,
You will have twenty-one future rebirths.
An emanation of Chenrezik, you know all three times.

Chokgyur Lingpa then continued to give the names of the Karmapas who would be born after his time: The names needed after Thekchok (Supreme Vehicle, the fourteenth Karmapa) passes into nirvana Are the Dewe Dagnyi (Very Nature of Bliss, the fifteenth Karmapa), Rigpe Dorje (Vajra of Awareness, the sixteenth Karmapa), Ogyen Trinley (Enlightened Activity of Guru Rinpoche, the seventeenth Karmapa), and Samten (Stable Contemplation, the future eighteenth Karmapa), and so forth. He also spoke individually of each incarnation and made the following prediction of the seventeenth Karmapa:



Nearby, at the foot of a verdant tree that grows on rocky mountains is the
seventeenth incarnation of the Karmapa together with Kenting Tai Situ.
This is a symbol that through their minds being fused as one, the leaves
and petals of the Buddha’s teaching will unfold and the fruit, the essence
of the Dakpo Kagyu, will be plentiful.

The text of Guru Rinpoche, Hidden Predictions (mDo byang gud sbas), gives the vast perspective:



The teachings of my emanation, the Karmapa,
Will not come to an end until the teachings of the fortunate kalpa
have come to a close.




Read More :

2013/11/16

Paying Homage to Shakyamuni Buddha



16 November, 2013 – Bodhgaya
In a significant event for all concerned, His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje became the first world spiritual leader to visit the central shrine of Buddhism, the 1500 year old Mahabodhi temple complex, since the bombings by extremists earlier this year.
At the entrance to the temple grounds, he was welcomed warmly by the Monk-in-Charge, the Secretary of the Mahabodhi Temple Management Committee and the District Magistrate, who then escorted him.
By-passing the newly-established security checkpoints, Gyalwang Karmapa walked into the complex, down the central steps and headed directly to the Mahabodhi temple shrine room. He was greeted along the way by devotees from around the world. Flanking both sides of the pathway, they proffered pink and lilac lotus blossoms or ceremonial white scarves, and asked for his blessing. Inside the shrine room, His Holiness first offered a three-piece set of robes of hand-woven golden silk to the image of Lord Buddha, followed by seven bowls of fruit, flowers and food. As the monk-attendant draped the new robes over the Buddha image, His Holiness prostrated three times before commencing prayers in praise of Lord Buddha and for the peace and well-being of the world and all sentient beings. The short ceremony concluded with the lighting of a butter lamp.

When His Holiness emerged from the shrine room, hundreds of followers thronged behind him as he completed a circuit of the inner route around the temple, followed by a circuit of the outermost route. Blue skies and mild weather, much cooler than in previous years, made for a quick and comfortable circumambulation.
His Holiness was unable to complete the middle circuit this time because of another noteworthy event being held in the temple complex: the gold-plating of the dome of the 180- foot high Mahabodhi temple. The work is being carried out by a team of forty technical experts from Thailand, who work from bamboo scaffolding high above the temple grounds. They will be using nearly 300 kilograms of gold which has been gifted by the King of Thailand and his people. More than a thousand Thai monks, nuns and lay pilgrims, dressed in traditional white lay pilgrim’s robes, have gathered for the occasion. As His Holiness completed his circumambulations, the sound of their prayers and chanting filled the grounds.

This was the first official event of the Gyalwang Karmapa’s 2013-2014 winter programme in Bodhgaya.


2013.11.16 法王噶瑪巴朝拜正覺大塔 Paying Homage to Shakyamuni Buddha 
http://kagyuoffice.org/paying-homage-to-shakyamuni-buddha/

His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa Visits the Mahabodhi Temple Complex in Bodhgaya



16 November, 2013, Bodhgaya


2013.11.16 法王噶瑪巴朝拜正覺大塔 Paying Homage to Shakyamuni Buddha
 
In the first official event of the Gyalwang Karmapa’s  2013-2014 winter programme in Bodhgaya, he visited the central shrine of Buddhism, the 1500 year old Mahabodhi temple complex.

Escorted by the Monk-in-Charge, the Secretary of the Mahabodhi Management Committee, and the District Magistrate, Gyalwang Karmapa went directly to the Mahabodhi temple shrine room where he  offered a three-piece set of robes of hand-woven golden silk to the image of Lord Buddha, followed by seven bowls of fruit, flowers and food. As the monk-attendant draped the new robes over the Buddha image, His Holiness prostrated three times before commencing prayers in praise of Lord Buddha and for the peace and well-being of the world and all sentient beings. The short ceremony concluded with the lighting of a butter lamp.
Hundreds of followers from all over the world  thronged behind him as His Holiness circumambulated the temple, first on the inner route and then on the outer route.

While His Holiness completed his circumambulation, the sound of prayers and chanting  from the Thai congregation, assembled  for the gilding of the Mahabodhi temple’s dome, filled the grounds.  The work is being carried out by a team of forty technical experts from Thailand, who work from bamboo scaffolding high above the temple grounds.  They will be using nearly 300 kilograms of gold which has been gifted by the King of Thailand and his people. More than a thousand Thai monks, nuns and lay pilgrims, dressed in traditional white lay pilgrim’s robes, have gathered for the occasion.

2013/11/14

Karmapa says the issue of Tibet’s environment is not political (Tibetan Review)





(TibetanReview.net, Nov14, 2013)  The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, one of Tibet’s foremost religious leaders and the head of the Karma Kagyu school within the Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, has said Nov 11-12 that the issue of Tibet transcends politics and concerns the interest not only of its neighbouring countries but also all of Asia and possibly the rest of the world when it comes to talking about the environment. "The fact that China has control of Tibet does not mean they have the right to do whatever they want to the Tibetan environment," the AFP Nov 12 quoted the Karmapa as saying.

"Whatever happens to the Tibetan environment will definitely impact its neighbours and also eventually all of Asia," he was further quoted as saying.

The Karmapa spoke in New Delhi where on Nov 12 he addressed the Fifth Khoryug Conference, an annual environmental meet, attended by 60 monks and nuns from monasteries across the Himalayas at the India International Centre, New Delhi. Khoryug is a network of 55 Buddhist monasteries, nunneries and centres which work together on environmental protection in the Himalayan regions under the leadership of the Karmapa.

"During the more than 50 years since China took over Tibet, there has been a great deal of development and activity including military installations by the Chinese that have impacted the Tibetan environment," the report quoted him as saying. He has cited mining and dam building as other activities in Tibet that have disastrous environmental consequences for Asia.

He wanted India as the country having the deepest connect with Tibet to be clearer in expressing its concerns over the environmental devastation taking place there.

The annual environmental conference, an initiative of the current Karmapa, was designed to bring together monks and nuns from the participating communities and centres across the Himalayas for education, problem-solving workshops and to formulate specific water conservation projects to be implemented in their local communities.

During the latest, five-day conference, the participants undertook a trip to the bank of the highly polluted Yamuna River where the Karmapa led prayers for its restoration. He was accompanied by the Khoryug monks and nuns as well as local residents. Dr Manoj Misra, Director of the Yamuna Jiye Abhiyaan, an organization which aims to restore the sacred river, also took part.
The Karmapa was recognized as the reincarnation of his 16th predecessor by the Dalai Lama while still in Tibet. China went along with that recognition and he was duly enthroned at his traditional seat of Tsurphu Monastery near the capital Lhasa. However, in Dec 1999, he fled Tibet, citing lack of religious freedom and fear of being used for political purposes by China. He currently lives at a monastery near Dharamsala, India, as the government of India still hasn’t cleared him to take up residence in his exile seat of Rumtek Monastery in the state of Sikkim. 

2013/11/12

“Environmental Conservation Must Be the Essence of Our Spiritual Practice”: Gyalwang Karmapa



12 November 2013 – India International Centre, New Delhi
On the final day of the 5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection being held in New Delhi the Gyalwang Karmapa spoke passionately about the environmental emergency facing the world, and pointed to our individual personal consumption choices as one way to make a difference.
“Because of the sheer numbers of the human population and because of modern technology, we are having a horrific impact on our environment,” he told the 60 monastic delegates gathered from across the Himalayan region. “And we’ve become so jaded about this on the whole that it is as if we are asleep in the sleep of ignorance about what we are doing to the environment.”
“Each and every one of the more than 7 billion people on this planet has a brain. We’re all capable of understanding this, and yet our ignorance about our misuse of the environment is shocking. We need to wake up from this ignorance, especially those who wish to practice spirituality. This is perhaps our greatest responsibility as spiritual practitioners.”
The Gyalwang Karmapa urged Mahayana Buddhists to bring environmental conservation into the very heart of their spiritual practice.
“The conservation of our environment—which is the ground of the existence of billions and billions of beings—must be our primary concern as Mahayana practitioners. Environmental conservation must be the very essence of our spiritual practice.”
He appealed to the gathered monastics to make a difference in their individual communities, and pointed out that there are simple choices we can each make to reduce our personal consumption of finite resources such as water.
“We need to think not only about our direct use of water, but also about our indirect use,” he said. As an example, he observed the large difference in the amount of water used to produce meat as opposed to grains. “Considering the amount of water that is expended for the consumption of meat, this adds another ethical concern to the eating of meat.”
Turning next to the environmental emergency faced in Tibet, the Gyalwang Karmapa called on China to take responsibility for protecting Tibet’s fragile and important environment.
“When we speak of the Tibetan cause, sometimes people mistake this as a uniquely political issue,” he began. “But in fact it is much more than that, and most importantly it is an environmental issue. The Tibetan plateau is of great environmental importance to this world, and therefore we call it the Third Pole and the water tower of Asia.”
The Gyalwang Karmapa then pointed out that traditionally the Tibetan way of life was lived in harmony with the environment.
“Since this way of life was a means of preserving the environment, it must at all costs be preserved—not only for the sake of Tibet itself, but because of the profound connection that the Tibetan environment has with all Asian nations, including Tibet’s adjacent neighbors.”
“With regard to Tibet’s neighbors,” he continued, “of course China took over Tibet more than 50 years ago. But that does not mean that China can do whatever it wants to the Tibetan environment. They must behave responsibly.”
The Gyalwang Karmapa then urged India to also play a more active role in protecting Tibet’s environment.
“With regard to the connection between Tibet and India, this connection is thousands of years old and is extremely profound. It is not simply a material or even a cultural connection – it is a spiritual one, the deepest possible connection. So therefore, India also is intimately connected with and bears some responsibility for this environment. This is true of other Asian nations as well.”
The Gyalwang Karmapa’s comments came at the conclusion of a week of training in water conservation issues for monastic representatives from 55 monasteries and nunneries across the Himalayan region. Under the umbrella of the Khoryug organization, which the Gyalwang Karmapa chairs, member monasteries and nunneries in the Himalayas actively protect their local environments through activities such as tree-planting drives, clean-ups, conservation of water resources, waste management, and education initiatives for their local communities.
Tenzin Norbu, Director of the Environment and Development Desk at the Central Tibetan Administration and who was a key speaker at the conference, commended the activities of Khoryug under the Gyalwang Karmapa’s leadership. He pointed out that the organization set an example not only for other Buddhist monasteries and nunneries from all lineages across the Himalayan region, but also for non-Buddhists too.

Dalai Lama potential successor tells China to clean up Tibet (AFP)


November 12, 2013, 3:32 am


Dalai Lama potential successor tells China to clean up Tibet       AFP


New Delhi (AFP) - A potential successor to the Dalai Lama Monday warned that Chinese military installations and other projects in Tibet could have disastrous environmental consequences for Asia.
Urgyen Trinley urged India to voice its concerns over Chinese development activities in his Himalayan home country.
"During the more than 50 years since China took over Tibet, there has been a great deal of development and activity including military installations by the Chinese that have impacted the Tibetan environment," Trinley told AFP.
"The fact China has control of Tibet does not mean they have the right to do whatever they want to the Tibetan environment," Trinley, who fled Tibet to India in 2000, said.
India, which fought a brief but bloody border war with its giant neighbour in 1962, accuses China of large scale construction of military infrastructure on its frontiers.
"A great deal of mining and dams are in Tibet now," the Buddhist monk, who resides in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh, said in an interview in New Delhi.
"Whatever happens to the Tibetan environment will definitely impact its neighbours and also eventually all of Asia," Trinley said through an interpreter.
"India has the deepest connect with Tibet and I would hope for a more clear expression of concern for the Tibetan environment from India," the spiritual leader added.
Trinley said he was in the national capital to educate "monks and nuns who live in monasteries in the Himalayan region" on environmental issues.
Tibetans have long chafed at China's rule over the vast Tibetan plateau, accusing Beijing of curbing religious freedoms and eroding their culture and language.
Trinley is recognised by both China and the Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of the Karmapa Lama, head of the Karma Kagyu lineage, one of Tibetan Buddhism's four major schools.
Recent appearances with the Dalai Lama have fuelled speculation he is being groomed as the Nobel peace laureate's spiritual successor.

Karmapa asks China, India to help save Tibetan plateau (zeenews)


Last Updated: Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 21:35  





New Delhi: The 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the third most important Tibetan religious head, Tuesday called on China and India to help save its environment. 

Speaking at the fifth Khoryug conference on environmental protection for Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and nunneries, the Karmapa said: "Some people think the Tibetan cause is a political issue, but it is much more than that. 

"The Tibetan plateau is of such great environmental importance that we call it the Third Pole and the water tower of Asia. Therefore, most importantly, Tibet is an environmental issue that affects all of Asia. 

"Just because China has had control over Tibet for the past 50 years does not mean it can do whatever it likes. China has responsibilities to protect the Tibetan environment," the 28-year-old said. 

"Historically, the Tibetan way of life was in harmony with the land, spiritually and environmentally, with no negative impact on Tibet's fragile ecosystems. 

"This way of life must at all costs be preserved, because of the central importance of the Tibetan plateau as a source of most of Asia's freshwater," said the Karmapa, who resides in a monastery on the outskirts of Dharamsala where the Dalai Lama is based. 

He said it was in India's best interest to take a more active role in ensuring that China meets those responsibilities. 

"Indeed the Tibetan plateau is the world's Third Pole and thus its environmental well-being is of great concern to the entire world. 

"However, we cannot wait for governments to act. The environmental emergency is too urgent a crisis for us to wait for someone else to do something. 

"Every single individual must act to protect the environment, and immediately. Each of us has a responsibility to act so we can leave a lasting home for future generations," the Buddhist monk said. 

The Karmapa, who fled Tibet and sought refuge in India in January 2000, is the spiritual head of the Karma Kagyu school, one of the four sects of Buddhism. 

He is considered the third most important Tibetan religious head after the Dalai Lama and the Panchen Lama. 

IANS
First Published: Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 21:35


http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/karmapa-asks-china-india-to-help-save-tibetan-plateau_889457.html

Karmapa calls on China take responsibility for Tibet's environment (TPI)


Tuesday, 12 November 2013 20:36 The Tibet Post International



The 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorjee during the conference
 held in New Delhi, the capital of India. Photo: TPI
New Delhi, India International Centre, 12 November, 2013: - His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorjee Tuesday called on the 60 monks and nuns attending the conference to lead water conservation initiatives in their local Himalayan communities.
At the close of a five-day environmental conference he convened in Delhi called on China to take responsibility for the environmental emergency on the Tibetan plateau, and for India to assume a greater role in protecting Tibet's environment as well.
The 5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries and Nunneries was dedicated to conservation of freshwater resources in the Himalayas, and brought together monks and nuns from 55 communities across the Himalayan region for education, problem-solving workshops and to formulate specific water conservation projects to implement in their local communities.
The conference included a trip to the bank of the Yamuna River, where His Holiness the Karmapa led prayers for the restoration of the sacred, yet highly polluted Yamuna, accompanied by the Khoryug monks and nuns and local residents, as well as Dr. Manoj Misra, Director of the Yamuna Jiye Abhiyaan organization that is dedicated to restoring the river.
Speaking at the close of the conference, the 17th Karmapa said: "Some people think the Tibetan cause is a political issue, but it is much more than that. The Tibetan plateau is of such great environmental importance that we call it the Third Pole and the water tower of Asia. Therefore, most importantly, Tibet is an environmental issue that affects all of Asia."
The Karmapa also commented: "Just because China has had control over Tibet for the past 50 years does not mean it can do whatever it likes. China has responsibilities to protect the Tibetan environment. Historically, the Tibetan way of life was in harmony with the land, spiritually and environmentally, with no negative impact on Tibet's fragile ecosystems.
This way of life must at all costs be preserved, because of the central importance of the Tibetan plateau as a source of most of Asia's freshwater. It is in India's best interest to take a more active role in ensuring that China meets those responsibilities. Indeed the Tibetan plateau is the world's Third Pole and thus its environmental well-being is of great concern to the entire world."
"However, we cannot wait for governments to act. The environmental emergency is too urgent a crisis for us to wait for someone else to do something. Every single individual must act to protect the environment, and immediately. Each of us has a responsibility to act so we can leave a lasting home for future generations," His Holiness the Karmapa said.
"As spiritual practitioners and certainly as Mahayana Buddhists, our greatest aspiration is to bring about the happiness of all beings. The conservation of our environment, which is the very ground of the existence of many billions of beings, must be our primary concern. Conservation must be the very essence of our spiritual practice."
The Karmapa asked his followers to act on two areas – modifying their personal consumption of water directly, as well as indirectly. Pointing out that although much of the earth's surface is covered with water, less than 3% is freshwater, and within that tiny percentage a mere 1% is available for our usage. Along with checking our direct consumption of water, the Karmapa called on the gathering to consider also their indirect consumption, since the production of consumer goods also entails intensive consumption of water.
Noting that the bulk of our water is used in agriculture, the Karmapa presented the scientific figures showing that meat consumes exponentially more water than vegetarian foodstuffs, and reiterated his longstanding appeal for vegetarianism as an environmental as well as ethical issue.
Under the auspices of His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Khoryug is a network of 55 Buddhist monasteries, nunneries and centres working together on environmental protection of the Himalayan region, with the aim of practically applying the values of compassion and interdependence towards the earth and all living beings that dwell here.
In association with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Sacred Earth program, which provides technical expertise and support, as well as ATREE (Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment), CSE (Centre for Science and the Environment), and the Director of the Environment and Development Desk within the Central Tibetan Administration.
The conference opened with an address by Union Minister of Rural Development Shri Jairam Ramesh, who urged the Khoryug association to "bring together institutions in these different countries in our region to launch a cohesive and unified challenge" to the environmental threat.
Since an important aim of the conference was for Himalayan monks and nuns to identify freshwater threats in their communities and create specific projects to counter those threats and conserve freshwater, the conference closed with monks and nuns presenting their plans for environmental initiatives for the upcoming year.

2013/11/11

The 9th Karmapa, Wangchug Dorje & Detail Images



Eastern Tibet

1600 - 1699

Karma (Kagyu) Lineage

124.46x82.55cm (49x32.50in)

Ground Mineral Pigment, Fine Gold Line on Cotton

Karma Gardri Painting School

Collection of Shelley & Donald Rubin

(acc.# P1994.27.1)
 


Gazing to the side, he holds the right hand up to the heart in a gesture of Dharma explication and the left in the lap holds a folio religious text wrapped in a white and green cloth cover. The head is adorned with the black vajra crown, a synthesis of the gift of the dakinis and the offering of Emperor Yung Lo. Attired in the orange and yellow garb of a monk, he is wrapped in a red meditation cloak, seated above a monk's mat and a blue cushion atop an ornate throne with a green cushion backrest. In front on a red table is a gold pitcher filled with flowers, a Dharma wheel ornament and an ornate bowl giving rise to a stream of vapour becoming a great mass of white billowing clouds supporting a heavenly scene with palaces, teachers and gods of various colour.

Standing at the left side an elderly monk respectfully covers his mouth with a fold of his yellow patchwork robe as he listens to the instructions from the emanation of Avalokiteshvara - Karmapa. At the lower front two seated monks engaged in the moment gesture dramatically.

At the top left is Vajra Amitayus, slightly peaceful and slightly wrathful, red in colour, with three faces, the right white and left blue. With six hands the first pair holds a long-life vase in the lap. The second pair holds a flower lasso on the right and with the left resting against the thigh holds the stem of a white lotus flower blossoming above the shoulder. The third pair holds in the right an upraised curved knife and a white skullcup in the left. Adorned with gold, jewels and blue and green silks, he is seated atop a white moon disc and pink lotus flower, surrounded by a green-blue nimbus and a jade green areola; drifting on a bank of white cloud.

At the bottom right is the wrathful protector Yama Dharmaraja, blue in colour, with a buffalo head. With three eyes, a gaping mouth and two horns, his yellow hair flows upward like flames. The right hand holds aloft a red stick with a white skull at the top, decorated with a red ribbon. The left hand holds out to the side a lasso. Adorned with a crown of five skulls, a green scarf, snakes and necklace of freshly severed heads, he stands atop a black buffalo, sun disc and white lotus seat surrounded by dark billowing smoke.

Recognized by Situ Rinpoche and enthroned by Shamar Rinpoche, this Karmapa spent most of his life living in a tent city travelling back and forth across the wilds of Tibet. Well educated and a moderately prolific writer, two of his more important compositions on mahamudra were the 'Ocean of Certainty' and 'Eliminating the Darkness of Ignorance.' One of his more famous students was Jonang Taranatha. (The names of the three main figures are written in fine gold lettering beneath each).

Jeff Watt 9-99

Front of Painting
Wylie Transliteration of Inscription: tse dpag me ba dzra ... , rje dbang phug do ... , 'jig phed ...